Loading Events

The Met: Live in HD
Verdi's La Traviata

Event Category:
Saturday, December 15
1PM - 5PM
$22 ($20 Members); $15 Students

Eligible for Student Rush Tickets

Tickets for all 2018-19 Met Opera screenings will be on sale for Guild Hall Members on Monday, July 16 through the Box Office only – visit us in person or call us at 631-324-4050 between 11am and 5pm through Labor Day.
Beginning Wednesday, July 18 at midnight, tickets will be on sale to the general public and will be available for purchase online as well as the link below.
Tickets available at GuildHall.org; Reception desk during Museum hours or by calling 631-324-0806; Box Office 2 hours prior to curtain at 631-324-4050; Theatermania.com; or 1-866-811-4111
158 Main Street
East Hampton, NY 11937 United States
Buy Tickets

Overview

New Production

1 p.m. ET / Approx. runtime: 3:32 [2 Intermissions]

Yannick Nézet-Séguin; Diana Damrau (Violetta Valéry), Juan Diego Flórez (Alfredo Germont), Quinn Kelsey (Giorgio Germont). Michael Mayer (Production); Christine Jones (Set Designer), Susan Hilferty (Costume Designer), Kevin Adams (Lighting Designer), Lorin Latarro (Choreographer)

World premiere: Venice, Teatro la Fenice, 1853.

ACT I

Violetta Valéry knows that she will die soon, exhausted by her restless life as a courtesan. At a party she is introduced to Alfredo Germont, who has been fascinated by her for a long time. Rumor has it that he has been enquiring after her health every day. The guests are amused by this seemingly naïve and emotional attitude, and they ask Alfredo to propose a toast. He celebrates true love, and Violetta responds in praise of free love. She is touched by his candid manner and honesty. Suddenly she feels faint, and the guests withdraw. Only Alfredo remains behind and declares his love. There is no place for such feelings in her life, Violetta replies. But she gives him a camellia, asking him to return when the flower has faded. He realizes this means he will see her again the following day. Alone, Violetta is torn by conflicting emotions—she doesn’t want to give up her way of life, but at the same time she feels that Alfredo has awakened her desire to be truly loved.

ACT II

Violetta has chosen a life with Alfredo, and they enjoy their love in the country, far from society. When Alfredo discovers that this is only possible because Violetta has been selling her property, he immediately leaves for Paris to procure money. Violetta has received an invitation to a masked ball, but she no longer cares for such distractions. In Alfredo’s absence, his father, Giorgio Germont, pays her a visit. He demands that she separate from his son, as their relationship threatens his daughter’s impending marriage. But over the course of their conversation, Germont comes to realize that Violetta is not after his son’s money—she is a woman who loves unselfishly. He appeals to Violetta’s generosity of spirit and explains that, from a bourgeois point of view, her liaison with Alfredo has no future. Violetta’s resistance dwindles and she finally agrees to leave Alfredo forever. Only after her death shall he learn the truth about why she returned to her old life. She accepts the invitation to the ball and writes a goodbye letter to her lover. Alfredo returns, and while he is reading the letter, his father appears to console him. But all the memories of home and a happy family can’t prevent the furious and jealous Alfredo from seeking revenge for Violetta’s apparent betrayal.

At the masked ball, news has spread of Violetta and Alfredo’s separation. There are grotesque dance entertainments, ridiculing the duped lover. Meanwhile, Violetta and her new lover, Baron Douphol, have arrived. Alfredo and the baron battle at the gaming table and Alfredo wins a fortune: lucky at cards, unlucky in love. When everybody has withdrawn, Alfredo confronts Violetta, who claims to be truly in love with the baron. In his rage Alfredo calls the guests as witnesses and declares that he doesn’t owe Violetta anything. He throws his winnings at her. Giorgio Germont, who has witnessed the scene, rebukes his son for his behavior. The baron challenges his rival to a duel.

ACT III

Violetta is dying. Her last remaining friend, Doctor Grenvil, knows that she has only a few more hours to live. Alfredo’s father has written to Violetta, informing her that his son was not injured in the duel. Full of remorse, Germont has told his son about Violetta’s sacrifice. Alfredo wants to rejoin her as soon as possible. Violetta is afraid that he might be too late. The sound of rampant celebrations are heard outside while Violetta is in mortal agony. But Alfredo does arrive and the reunion fills her with a final euphoria. Her energy and exuberant joy of life return. All sorrow and suffering seem to have left her—a final illusion, before death claims her.

Event Sponsors

The simulcasts at Guild Hall are made possible in part through the generosity of: 
Grand Tier: The Ellen and James S. Marcus Endowment for Musical Programming, 
Ann Cestone in memory of her sister Gloria, Phyllis Davis, Louise Phanstiel, The East Hampton Star 
Dress Circle: Norma Giorgetti in memory of Mary-Anne Szabaga, Barbara Horgan, Patti Kenner, Judy and Alex Laughlin, Jim Potter, Maryam Seley, Anita Sheldon, Norbert Weissberg in memory of Dr. Josef Weissberg 
Balcony Circle: Susan L. Blair, Maureen Bluedorn Frederic Cammann, Diane and Bill Dreher, Harriet Edwards, Ernest C. Leatherwood, Jr., Joan and Robert Osborne, Irene and Sidney Silverman, Veronica Stephens, Mary Stone, Sandra Thorn, Peter Van Hattum in memory of Harold K. Simmons, Anese Young, Jeannette and H. Peter Kriendler Charitable Trust  
Family Circle (*Gold): Julia Winston Adams, Paulette and Sanford Balsam, Carolyn and Gioacchino Balducci*, Gabrielle Bamberger*, Joanne Canary, Bonnie and Bob Cooperman*, Ann and George Davis*, James A. Fox*, Dr. and Mrs. Paul Garson, Francine Gluckman, Burton Greenhouse, Phyllis Kessler, Marsha Kranes, Robert F. Luckey*, Joan and Walter Marter, Marjorie A. Ogilvie, Carolyn Preische, Marcia Previti and Peter Gumpel *, David Rey, Connie and Larry Randolph, Beverly and Jerome Siegel, Nancy and Maurice Skurnik, Patricia and Andrew Steffan*, Jane Wood* 
Donations made to Guild Hall’s Met Opera Broadcast series in memory of Andy JacobyanskyNorman Abell, Monika and Bill Akin, Barbara Alexander, Linda and Kenneth Brown, Thomas Buehler and Rosemarie Schiller, Nancy and Paul Buscemi, Robert Chaloner and Oscar Mandes, Ellen and Charles Collins, Jane and Bruce Collins, Carol and Tom Deane, Maria Dolecka, East Hampton Healthcare Foundation, Peter Gamby and Julie Small-Gamby, Eva and Walter Looss, Ellen and Arnie Jacobs, Carol Elaine Peterson and Richard Kahn, Elaine Peterson and Richard Kahn, Lynn and Alan Kaplan, Judy and Alex Laughlin, Suse and Peter Lowenstein, Linda and Lawrence Miller, Claire and Peter Odell, Mary Ann and Robert Stanutz, Susan and Gil Steckowski, Laura Stein and Eugene Wolsk, Florence Stone, the Symer-Rafferty Family, Patricia and Michael Tuths, and Joseph Wood   
Become a Sponsor

View All Programs & Events

View All Programs & Events