Exhibition Archives - Guild Hall

Now Here – Panel Discussion with the Artists

Join us for this exclusive opportunity to meet the Now Here artists and get an understanding of the artists collective and the site-specific installation, ask questions, and engage with the art.


The No W here Collective, made up of Alice Hope, Toni Ross, and Bastienne Schmidt, will present the off-site exhibition entitled Now Here, Curated by Christina Mossaides Strassfield. The project will primarily respond to the Life Saving Station’s faking box (a box in which a long rope is faked; used in the life-saving service for a line attached to a shot), seen as the emblematic artifact in the Station’s collection that emanates their mission — to save lives. The faking box, in itself, embodies a formal aesthetic that relates to the Collective’s original artifact and inspiration, the Metropolitan Museum’s Marshallese Navigation Chart.

The collective will show works in the south facing crew quarter’s room on the second floor, the Station’s western facing backyard, and the southeast corner of the wrap around porch, as well as other areas on the site. In the crew’s quarters, the artists will do responsive installations to the room itself and the faking box. The outdoor installations will also be responsive to the site, the faking box, and will include implicit references to the Navigation Chart, from the artists’ non-literal creative perspectives.

About the Amagansett Life-Saving Station
The Amagansett Station was constructed on Atlantic Avenue in 1902, one of a network of thirty life-saving stations on the South Shore of Long Island. Through each night and in bad weather the crew at these stations kept watch from the lookout tower and by patrolling the beach. Discovering a ship in distress, the life-savers would perform a rescue by launching their surfboat or by firing a line to the ship and taking people off with a breeches buoy. From 1902 to 1937 the crew of the Amagansett Life-Saving Station, most of whom were experienced local fishermen and shore whalers, kept watch over this beach and rescued sailors and passengers from a number of shipwrecks.

The Life-Saving Service and the Lighthouse Service were the two federal programs intended to increase the safety of coastal navigation. These two services were later joined in the U.S. Coast Guard. The Amagansett Life-Saving Station complements the Montauk Point Lighthouse in recalling that era of our maritime history when ships sailing the ocean provided the principal means of transporting goods and people in coastal America.

https://www.amagansettlss.org/

Now Here – Meet the Artists Talk & Walkabout

Join us for this exclusive opportunity to meet the Now Here artists and get an understanding of the artists collective and the site-specific installation, ask questions, and engage with the art.


The No W here Collective, made up of Alice Hope, Toni Ross, and Bastienne Schmidt, will present the off-site exhibition entitled Now Here, Curated by Christina Mossaides Strassfield. The project will primarily respond to the Life Saving Station’s faking box (a box in which a long rope is faked; used in the life-saving service for a line attached to a shot), seen as the emblematic artifact in the Station’s collection that emanates their mission — to save lives. The faking box, in itself, embodies a formal aesthetic that relates to the Collective’s original artifact and inspiration, the Metropolitan Museum’s Marshallese Navigation Chart.

The collective will show works in the south facing crew quarter’s room on the second floor, the Station’s western facing backyard, and the southeast corner of the wrap around porch, as well as other areas on the site. In the crew’s quarters, the artists will do responsive installations to the room itself and the faking box. The outdoor installations will also be responsive to the site, the faking box, and will include implicit references to the Navigation Chart, from the artists’ non-literal creative perspectives.

About the Amagansett Life-Saving Station
The Amagansett Station was constructed on Atlantic Avenue in 1902, one of a network of thirty life-saving stations on the South Shore of Long Island. Through each night and in bad weather the crew at these stations kept watch from the lookout tower and by patrolling the beach. Discovering a ship in distress, the life-savers would perform a rescue by launching their surfboat or by firing a line to the ship and taking people off with a breeches buoy. From 1902 to 1937 the crew of the Amagansett Life-Saving Station, most of whom were experienced local fishermen and shore whalers, kept watch over this beach and rescued sailors and passengers from a number of shipwrecks.

The Life-Saving Service and the Lighthouse Service were the two federal programs intended to increase the safety of coastal navigation. These two services were later joined in the U.S. Coast Guard. The Amagansett Life-Saving Station complements the Montauk Point Lighthouse in recalling that era of our maritime history when ships sailing the ocean provided the principal means of transporting goods and people in coastal America.

https://www.amagansettlss.org/

Guild Hall presents NOW HERE at Amagansett Lifesaving Station

Guild Hall presents NOW HERE at Amagansett Lifesaving Station

July 16th thru September 30th, 2022
Opening Reception: Sunday, July 17, 4-6PM

Hours:
Interior: Friday – Sunday, 12-5PM, by appointment
Exterior: Any time
Note: Face masks are required indoors for visitors over the age of 2.

Amagansett U.S. Life Saving Station, 160 Atlantic Avenue, Amagansett

The No W here Collective, made up of Alice Hope, Toni Ross, and Bastienne Schmidt, will present the off-site exhibition entitled Now Here, Curated by Christina Mossaides Strassfield. The project will primarily respond to the Life Saving Station’s faking box (a box in which a long rope is faked; used in the life-saving service for a line attached to a shot), seen as the emblematic artifact in the Station’s collection that emanates their mission — to save lives. The faking box, in itself, embodies a formal aesthetic that relates to the Collective’s original artifact and inspiration, the Metropolitan Museum’s Marshallese Navigation Chart.

Faxing box, part of the collection at the Amagansett U.S. Lifesaving Station, 2022. Photo: Joe Brondo for Guild Hall

The collective will show works in the south facing crew quarter’s room on the second floor, the Station’s western facing backyard, and the southeast corner of the wrap around porch, as well as other areas on the site. In the crew’s quarters, the artists will do responsive installations to the room itself and the faking box. The outdoor installations will also be responsive to the site, the faking box, and will include implicit references to the Navigation Chart, from the artists’ non-literal creative perspectives.

Collective member Alice Hope states “The Life Saving Station’s faking box is formally beautiful, and poetically and conceptually inspiring. I think of it as emblematic to the life saving station itself; it’s the organizing principle to a lifeline. For the last few years I’ve been stringing can tabs to make a continuous line that resembles rope. Sometimes the line accumulates in tangled piles and often I organize it into spiral forms. The faking box will inspire a new organization — a new form of my continuous can tab line.”

The exhibition will be accompanied by educational talks and panels with the artists and as well as family workshops to supplement the site-specific installation experience.

About the Amagansett Life-Saving Station
The Amagansett Station was constructed on Atlantic Avenue in 1902, one of a network of thirty life-saving stations on the South Shore of Long Island. Through each night and in bad weather the crew at these stations kept watch from the lookout tower and by patrolling the beach. Discovering a ship in distress, the life-savers would perform a rescue by launching their surfboat or by firing a line to the ship and taking people off with a breeches buoy. From 1902 to 1937 the crew of the Amagansett Life-Saving Station, most of whom were experienced local fishermen and shore whalers, kept watch over this beach and rescued sailors and passengers from a number of shipwrecks.

The Life-Saving Service and the Lighthouse Service were the two federal programs intended to increase the safety of coastal navigation. These two services were later joined in the U.S. Coast Guard. The Amagansett Life-Saving Station complements the Montauk Point Lighthouse in recalling that era of our maritime history when ships sailing the ocean provided the principal means of transporting goods and people in coastal America.

https://www.amagansettlss.org/

In Conversation: Jeff Muhs and Christina Mossaides Strassfield

Christina Strassfield has known Jeff Muhs for 30 years and has followed his work’s evolution.  Join her as she asks in-depth questions on how and what his inspiration is for creating these unique works of art and what compels him to work across different media simultaneously.


Jeff Muhs was the “Top Honors” winner of the 2018 Artist Members Exhibition, selected by Connie Choi, Associate Curator,  The Studio Museum of Harlem, New York. Muhs is a contemporary American artist known for both his paintings and sculptures. Engaged in exploring art history as well as using found materials, the artist’s practice includes blurred versions of paintings, expressive abstractions based on the Long Island landscape, and concrete sculptures of female torsos tightly bonded in various materials. Born in 1966 in Southampton, NY, his father was a sculptor who taught Muhs wood carving at a young age. Going on to attend the School of Visual Arts in New York during the mid-1980s, Muhs directed his focus towards painting before returning to sculpture later in his career. The artist’s works are held in the collections of the Guild Hall Museum in East Hampton, NY, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Hunter Museum of American Art in Chattanooga, TN, among others. Muhs continues to work from his studio in Southampton, NY. 


Fitted face masks are required for all guests over the age of 2 indoors regardless of vaccination status, except when eating or drinking. Click HERE for full COVID-19 protocol.

Gallery Tour of Permanent Collection with Christina Mossaides Strassfield, Museum Director/Chief Curator

Join Christina Strassfield for the opportunity to learn more about individual works of art as she talks about a selection of works from the holdings of over 2400 works that reside in the Permanent Collection.  Strassfield has chosen 90 works from all media to show the historical contribution of artists of the area.  Over her nearly 30 year tenure Strassfield has been personally responsible for attaining many of these donations for the Permanent Collection.

90 Years, curated by Christina Mossaides Strassfied, is a selection of paintings, sculptures, photographs, and works on paper showcasing 90 years of collecting Artists of the Eastern End of Long Island.  From its earliest days, the museum collected and showcased artists who lived and worked in the area. The mission of the museum has held fast and a selection over 2,500 works will be featured including works by Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning and Roy Lichtenstein.


Fitted face masks are required for all guests over the age of 2 indoors regardless of vaccination status, except when eating or drinking. Click HERE for full COVID-19 protocol.

Gallery Tour with Jeff Muhs

Join Jeff Muhs, winner of the 2018 Artist Members Exhibition, for an up-close and personal tour with the artist discussing his sculptures and paintings followed by Q & A.

This is a unique opportunity to learn about the artist’s technique and innovative process of using cement as his sculptural medium and to examine the various series of paintings included in this exhibition.

Winner of the 2018 Annual Guild Hall Artist Members Exhibition

Jeff Muhs was selected by Connie Choi, Associate Curator,  The Studio Museum of Harlem., New York. Jeff Muhs is a contemporary American artist known for both his paintings and sculptures. Engaged in exploring art history as well as using found materials, the artist’s practice includes blurred versions of paintings, expressive abstractions based on the Long Island landscape, and concrete sculptures of female torsos tightly bonded in various materials. Born in 1966 in Southampton, NY, his father was a sculptor who taught Muhs wood carving at a young age. Going on to attend the School of Visual Arts in New York during the mid-1980s, Muhs directed his focus towards painting before returning to sculpture later in his career. The artist’s works are held in the collections of the Guild Hall Museum in East Hampton, NY, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Hunter Museum of American Art in Chattanooga, TN, among others. Muhs continues to work from his studio in Southampton, NY.


Fitted face masks are required for all guests over the age of 2 indoors regardless of vaccination status, except when eating or drinking. Click HERE for full COVID-19 protocol.

90 Years: Selections from the Permanent Collection

90 Years features a selection of paintings, sculptures, photographs and works on paper showcasing 90 years of Guild Hall’s commitment to collecting artists of the Eastern End of Long Island.  Museum Director/Chief Curator Christina Mossaides Strassfield has chosen 90 works from all media to show the historical contribution of artists of the area.

The exhibition includes works by John Alexander, Peggy Bacon, George Bellows, Lynda Benglis, Ross Bleckner, Alexander Brook, James Brooks, Rudy Burckhardt, Howard Russell Butler, Henri Cartier-Bresson, John Chamberlain, Chuck Close, Stuart Davis, Elaine de Kooning, Willem de Kooning, James de Pasquale, Jim Dine, Gaines Ruger Donoho, Jimmy Ernst, Max Ernst, Audrey Flack, John Ferren, Eric Fischl, Eric Freeman, Jane Freilicher, Cornelia Foss, Arnold Genthe, April Gornik, Eunice Golden, Adolph Gottlieb, George Grosz, Beatrice Grover, Robert Gwathmey, Childe Hassam, Mary Heilmann, Arthur Turnbull Hill, Judith Hudson, Bryan Hunt, Jasper Johns, William King, Lee Krasner, Barbara Kruger, Ibram Lassaw, Claude Lawrence, Roy Lichtenstein, Donald Lipski, Alvin Loving, Conrad Marca-Relli, Paton Miller, Thomas Moran, Thomas Moran, Robert Motherwell, Hans Namuth, Francis Newton, Alfonso Ossorio, Harvey Havelock Pierce, Jackson Pollock, Fairfield Porter, Robert Rauschenberg, John Reed, Larry Rivers, James Rosenquest, Clifford Ross, David Salle, Miriam Schapiro, Alan Shields, David Slater, Cindy Sherman, Frank Stella, Keith Sonnier, Moses Soyer, Raphael Soyer, Saul Steinberg, Strong-Cuevas, Donald Sultan, Andy Warhol, Lemuel Maynard Wiles, Jane Wilson, Tile Club and E. Saroldi, Robert Wilson, Frank Wimberley, Nina Yankowitz, Darius Yektai, Manoucher Yektai, Robert Rahway Zakanitch, and Joe Zucker.

Moran and Woodhouse Galleries
Curator: Christina Strassfield

ABOUT GUILD HALL’S PERMANENT COLLECTION

In 1931, when Mrs. Lorenzo E. Woodhouse dedicated Guild Hall as a cultural center for the community, The New York Times noted that Howard Russell Butler’s portrait of Thomas Moran on exhibit was not a loan but an acquisition. “It marks the beginning of a permanent collection which is proposed to build up in Guild Hall,” the newspaper explained.

From the beginning 90 years ago, the holdings have grown significantly in size and scope. In the early 1960’s, the collection began to focus on the artists who have lived and worked in the region, including some of the country’s most celebrated painters, sculptors, photographers and graphic artists. In 1973, the museum received the distinction of being accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, and it was reaccredited in 2010. Today, the holdings of 19th, 20th and 21st century art number some 2,200 objects, and the museum continues to acquire works by donation and acquisition.  

With its close proximity to New York City, the East End became a popular tourist destination with the onset of the Long Island Railroad in the late 19th century. The LIRR was very active in marketing the charms of the region by distributing thousands of brochures and leaflets. In the 1870s, Hudson River School painters portrayed the white sand beaches of eastern Long Island. Winslow Homer came to visit in 1872, and in 1878 a group of New York artists known as the Tile Club traveled to the East End and visited several of its small villages, including East Hampton. Thomas Moran and his family settled permanently in 1884. His home and studio became the center of life for artists who visited the village. In the teens, twenties and thirties, many artists, including Guy Pene du Bois and George Bellows, visited the area. Later after WWII, the Surrealists, aided by artist and philanthropist Gerald Murphy, were welcomed guests. They were followed by the Abstract Expressionist artists Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner and Willem de Kooning; Pop artists Roy Lichtenstein, James Rosenquist and Andy Warhol; Photorealists Audrey Flack and Chuck Close; 80’s and 90’s Neo-expressionist artists Eric Fischl, David Salle; as well as many contemporary artists, such as Ross Bleckner, Cindy Sherman and Richard Prince. These artist-residents continue to make the East End the country’s foremost art colony.


Fitted face masks are required for all guests over the age of 2 indoors regardless of vaccination status, except when eating or drinking. Click HERE for full COVID-19 protocol.

Jeff Muhs: The Uncanny Valley

Winner of the 2018 Annual Guild Hall Artist Members Exhibition

Jeff Muhs: The Uncanny Valley will open on October 30 in tandem with the Permanent Collection exhibition. As a local multidisciplinary artist, Jeff Muhs has worked in a variety of mediums and genres and this exhibition will feature both his sculptural works as well as his paintings. In 2018, Muhs participated in Guild Hall’s annual Artist Members Exhibition where he received the Top Honors award for his concrete sculpture Callipyge, selected by Connie Choi, Associate Curator at The Studio Museum of Harlem. The prize for the recipient of the top honor is a solo exhibition in the Spiga Gallery.

The Uncanny Valley originates from a sculptural process the artist calls “Dynamic Free Casting.” By discovering this method, the artist has developed new means for forming concrete, all while embracing its inherent fluidity and weight. By pushing the physical limits of the materials as well as his own ability to manipulate, he has discovered a personal source of infinite creativity.   

The Uncanny Valley is a hypothesized relationship between the degree of an objects’ resemblance to a human being and the emotional response to such an object,“ shared artist Jeff Muhs. “For me, The Uncanny Valley was the moment when I first saw the results of my concrete sculpture as flesh. What had previously been an exploration of more architectural forms, by manor of my process, presented itself as flesh-like. I have been participating in the Guild Hall Artist Members Exhibition for about 25 years. I see it as a great focal point for our creative community. An opportunity for camaraderie and to share our artistic expressions with one another. It is a great honor to have been chosen as the Top Honors recipient for my sculpture and to be awarded the opportunity to exhibit at this cultural institution, so rich in the history of our local artistic community and 20th century art.”

Spiga Gallery


Fitted face masks are required for all guests over the age of 2 indoors regardless of vaccination status, except when eating or drinking. Click HERE for full COVID-19 protocol.

Social Fabric: In the Public Square

Interdisciplinary artist Andrea Cote and choreographer Ann Robideaux will activate the Minikes Garden as a place to gather amid a video installation accompanied by live sound by Chris Jones, and curated by Christina Mossiades Strassfield, Museum Director and Chief Curator.

The project explores how we embody personal and communal movement languages, through containment and connection in domestic and public spheres. The artists invited both professional dancers and recreational movers to explore movement inside six-foot square sheets delineated with geometric forms and cosmological patterns. As we occupy this present liminal zone, the artists create a place for visitors to inhabit that is at once intimate and communal.

Reservations are not required. Simply drop in over the course of their time in the garden!

The eAT Coffee Bar will be open for drinks and refreshments!